Narratives On Visual Perception

One of my earliest and most vivid childhood memories is the exhilaration of coming to a sudden understanding of the working principles of things around me. It was as if a toothpick with two round slices of carrot speared on each end, an abstract reference to the concept of wheels and axle, sparked my brain into existence. Since then, the resonance of this experience has an alluring effect on the way I observe, think, and act. Working with photography, I use still images as metaphors to articulate and communicate visual stories. As a result, I have become increasingly interested in exploring the process that transpires behind the camera and the retina, in the human brain, where consciousness arises, information acquires meaning, and life’s narrative takes shape.

This series essentially began in 2007 as a slow accumulation of images captured across the United States and Europe. In time, the work evolved through a game of improvisation, forging the contents of memory into a two-dimensional “Delphic” sculpture of information. Diptychs and triptychs — a car parked at the end of a dirt road overlooking a bay, a thrift store’s dusty front window, and a mythic creature escaping darkness — form references to impressions that initially caught my attention as a triangulation of color, form, and texture, reflecting various intensities of light. To eventually imply new correlations between situations, events, and environments, anticipating each recipient’s individual interpretation. 

Looking, seeing, and assigning meaning to the sensory stimuli of the world has never been a straightforward endeavor. Vision and visual perception can be regarded as the mind’s opposing thumb, attempting a grip on elusive reality. This act involves many overlapping factors, such as personality, language, culture, intention, emotion, and experiences.

Realities of Information is a study exploring the process whereby discrete events -presented in the form of photographic images as disassociated segments of a narrative- merge into a flow of continuity inside a viewer’s mind. The work lies idle in a state of contextual limbo and ambiguity between reality, memory, and imagination, yet always holding the potential to stimulate curiosity, intuition, insight, and creativity in a way that fuses pieces of information into an emerging story. 

Acknowledgements: This project is a multi-year, ongoing research and I am grateful  for the generous attention, support and encouragement by Judy Walgren at Michigan State University, UK based curator, Samia Ashraf, Dr. Agnes Leotsakos, WHO Healthcare Specialist, and Dr. Konstantinos Petsanis, Behavioral Neurologist at Biel Hospital Centre in Geneva.

One of my earliest and most vivid childhood memories is the exhilaration of coming to a sudden understanding of the working principles of things around me. It was as if a toothpick with two round slices of carrot speared on each end, an abstract reference to the concept of wheels and axle, sparked my brain into existence. Since then, the resonance of this experience has an alluring effect on the way I observe, think, and act. Working with photography, I use still images as metaphors to articulate and communicate visual stories. As a result, I have become increasingly interested in exploring the process that transpires behind the camera and the retina, in the human brain, where consciousness arises, information acquires meaning, and life’s narrative takes shape.

This series essentially began in 2007 as a slow accumulation of images captured across the United States and Europe. In time, the work evolved through a game of improvisation, forging the contents of memory into a two-dimensional “Delphic” sculpture of information. Diptychs and triptychs — a car parked at the end of a dirt road overlooking a bay, a thrift store’s dusty front window, and a mythic creature escaping darkness — form references to impressions that initially caught my attention as a triangulation of color, form, and texture, reflecting various intensities of light. To eventually imply new correlations between situations, events, and environments, anticipating each recipient’s individual interpretation. 

Looking, seeing, and assigning meaning to the sensory stimuli of the world has never been a straightforward endeavor. Vision and visual perception can be regarded as the mind’s opposing thumb, attempting a grip on elusive reality. This act involves many overlapping factors, such as personality, language, culture, intention, emotion, and experiences.

Realities of Information is a study exploring the process whereby discrete events -presented in the form of photographic images as disassociated segments of a narrative- merge into a flow of continuity inside a viewer’s mind. The work lies idle in a state of contextual limbo and ambiguity between reality, memory, and imagination, yet always holding the potential to stimulate curiosity, intuition, insight, and creativity in a way that fuses pieces of information into an emerging story.

Acknowledgements: This project is a multi-year, ongoing research and I am grateful  for the generous attention, support and encouragement by Judy Walgren at Michigan State University, UK based curator, Samia Ashraf, Dr. Agnes Leotsakos, WHO Healthcare Specialist, and Dr. Konstantinos Petsanis, Behavioral Neurologist at Biel Hospital Centre in Geneva.